Tag Archive | The Wall Street Journal

Black Males Idiotic Attempts to Justify Sexual Harassment, Street Harassment and Other Crimes

06 2017 caricature bmlua

Street Harassed Again–NW Washington, D.C.

One evening I was leaving work from the office building. I was headed eastbound on 16th and L streets in NW, Washington, D.C.  As it was evening time it was already dark outside.  Other people were bustling also leaving work or tending to other matters. As I was walking, a dark-skinned, 6 foot-plus older black male (say pushing 60 years old) walked towards me while I was still on the sidewalk. He appeared from photothe street as a pedestrian from out of no where on my left facing the opposite direction and with a loud, condescending voice yelled to my face Hallelujah!, while looking me up and down (mind you I am always in hijab, long skirts or loose trousers) with a dirty smirk.  The dark-skinned black male simultaneously did this odd bend at a 45 degree angle to ensure I knew he was referring to me.  I was tired and solely yelled “nigger.” He immediate stood upright and began to walk away. It was then I realized that a Caucasian male was walking behind me in the same direction. I am unsure whether the demented, dark-skinned black male stopped merely because I referred to him as to what he actually was or he was embarrassed that he was called that by another person of color IN THE PRESENCE of a white male.  I believe it was a combination of both.  It was disgusting that someone who appeared possibly old as a grandfather would attempt to disrupt a cover Sunni Muslim leaving work and minding her own business.

Today’s black male is the problem. Black “Christians” today are the problem, they are a public nuisance and a public health menace.

News Article: The University of Louisville is hosting an event next month aimed at combating sexual and street harassment

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/kentucky/articles/2017-03-29/uofl-to-host-event-to combat-street-harassment

 The University of Louisville is hosting an event next month aimed at combating sexual and street harassment.

March 29, 2017, at 2:28 a.m.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The University of Louisville is hosting an event next month aimed at combating sexual and street harassment.

The university says the “Cards Against Catcalling” event is scheduled April 6 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. EDT in the Red Barn at the Belknap Campus. The event will be hosted by the Women 4 Women Student Board and the UofL Women’s Center.

The event is part of the national Anti-Street Harassment Week, organized by Stop Street Harassment, a usnews.pngnonprofit group working to end gender-based street harassment.

Hadley Hendrick, a member of Women 4 Women and chair of “Cards Against Catcalling,” says street harassment is a common problem for women, minorities and members of the LGBT community.

The event will be free and open to the public.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

U.S. News & World Report - BrandFuse

…even in 2017

The caricature of the hyper-sexualized black brute has become self-fulfilling prophecy. The true Black men of the past would be so ashamed and disgusted at what a core group of black American “Christian” males have morphed into the past several decades:

even in 2017

End the Cycle of Street Harassment: Photo Chart 2017

cycle (1)

Online Article: Street Harassment Is a Public Health Problem: March 20, 2017

https://www.citylab.com/crime/2017/03/street-harassment-is-a-public-health-problem-the-case-of-mexico-city/520185/Street Harassment Is a Public Health Problem

Women who have been harassed may feel less trust in their community, with potential long-term impacts on mental health and well-being.

Lauren Ferreira Cardoso

March 20, 2017

“I actually don’t remember when I was first harassed on the street, but I do remember when I first experienced it as an abusive act: I was an adolescent traveling with my mom in a crowded underground wagon, where men could easily touch women without anyone noticing and with little possibility to prevent it.

This was the experience of Lucía Vázquez, a researcher in Mexico City, Mexico. Unfortunately, her story is not unique.

According to a multi-country poll by YouGov, Mexico City ranks first among 16 international cities surveyed for physical and verbal harassment on public transportation. Street harassment, a form of gender-based violence against women, can include any act or comment perpetrated in a public space that is unwanted and threatening, and is motivated by a person’s perceived sex or gender.

Violence against women in public spaces is not exclusive to Mexico City, of course. Experiences of street harassment—from being whistled at to being touched without consent—are reported each day on crowd-sourced websites like Hollaback and Safecity in dozens of other locations from New York and New Delhi, to Lawrence, Kansas and Lubbock, Texas.

There is still much to be learned about how harassment and feeling unsafe in public spaces affects the well-being of women and girls—a topic I focus on in my doctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice—but the global scale of these experiences is concerning. Studies documenting the prevalence of street harassment in more than 35 countries show it could have widespread health effects across the globe.

Street harassment in Mexico City

One of the latest studies on this issue aimed to understand the extent of street harassment and its impacts on women, girls and communities in Mexico City. All of the women in this study had previously screened positive for intimate partner violence, a prerequisite for inclusion in the parent study.

Paola Abril Campos, a doctoral student at the Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is a native of Mexico City. She said in an interview for this article:

“Growing up, I learned to fake a phone call to my parents to feel safer and avoid harassment. I learned to wear not the clothes I wanted, but the clothes that made me feel ‘safe.’ I learned to take quick detours during my daily commute. And I learned to put up with the impotence I felt when harassed.”

Her experiences motivated her to conduct a study on street harassment that was published in January in Salud Pública de México, a journal published by Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health.

In this study, Campos and colleagues surveyed 952 women who were seeking health care in Mexico City’s community health clinics. More than 60 percent of the women, 62.8 percent, reported experiencing at least one form of street harassment in the past month alone. For one in four women, 26.8 percent, the abuse was physical.

The study found that the harassment, or fear of harassment, had negative impacts on the daily routines of these women. Nearly 70 percent reported some type of disruptions in their mobility, including missing, being late to or having to change jobs or schools. And yet, Campos said, “The costs and consequences of street harassment to women’s lives have remained invisible.”

The study also found that street harassment may diminish women’s sense of connectedness and trust in their community. Social isolation from one’s community can have long-term implications for well-being and can lead to chronic disease and poor mental health. Therefore, street harassment may contribute to these other public health concerns.

For the women in this study who were also victims of intimate partner violence, violence is a threat in both public and private. Jhumka Gupta, a global and community health professor at George Mason University and senior author of the study, stated: “Comprehensive interventions are needed to ensure women and girls’ safety both in public settings and in private spaces.”

Emerging solutions

There is some political will to address the issue in Mexico City. In conjunction with local authorities, UN Women has launched the program “Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces for Women and Girls,” which is promoting women’s safety through, among other mechanisms, providing women-only buses throughout the city.

The city’s mayor, Miguel Ángel Mancera Espinosa, is also supporting an initiative that distributes whistles to women that they can use when someone harasses them. The idea is to “break the silence” and bring attention to harassers.

Street harassment is a common problem in the United States too. A recent nationally representative survey found that 65 percent of U.S. women have faced street harassment at some point in their lifetimes. These numbers may be rising.

The Southern Poverty Law Center reports that there has been a post-election uptick of harassment and intimidation of many marginalized groups, including women. However, in February a new bill aimed at preventing street harassment in Washington, D.C. was introduced to its city council. It seeks to “eradicate street harassment in the District of Columbia through education, awareness, data collection and culture change.” The bill is broad and inclusive in its definition of street harassment and comprehensive in its approach. Will other cities follow its lead?

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

 

Rally Against Street Harassment in New York: April 08, 2017

Anti-Street Harassment Rally in New York:

April 08, 2017. For Full Announcement please see:

https://nycprotests.com/nyc-protests/2017/4/8/2017-anti-street-harassment-rally