Tag Archive | rapists

The Pitt News: Pitt students condemn catcalling

https://pittnews.com/article/127683/arts-and-entertainment/pitt-students-condemn-catcalling/

Pitt students condemn catcalling
Joanna Li | Staff Writer
February 14, 2018

As a 12-year-old, Sophia Marshall stepped out of the house feeling confident in thePA map
outfit she had picked out that morning. As she waited for a friend by the local high
school, she heard a sharp whistle from out of the window of a passing car — her
first experience with catcalling.

Marshall, now a junior business administration major at Pitt, recalled feeling conflicted at the time — a mix of validation and violation.  It wasn’t until she came to college that the instances of catcalling became more frequent for Marshall — happening on the bus, her nightly walk home in Central Oakland and during her summer abroad in Paris — causing her to feel fed up.
“I’m not your baby, I’m not your honey,” Marshall said. “You don’t know me.”
According to a Cornell study, 85 percent of women experience street harassment before age 17 — and some women in Oakland are in that majority. Walking in groups of three or more, carrying pepper spray at all times and knowing a few self-defense techniques are all tips in the back of the minds of some women who have experienced street harassment at Pitt.

Marie Skoczylas, a visiting instructor in the Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies
Program, offers a definition of catcalling and its effects.
“Catcalling is singling out a target for sexual objectification and commenting publicly on
that person’s appearance,” Skoczylas said. “It requires a sense of entitlement to pull a
stranger into that kind of situation, knowing the advance may well be unwelcome and
insulting.”

Catcalling is part of the larger issue of street harassment. According to “Stop Street
Harassment” — a nonprofit organization focusing on ending gender-based street
harassment — street harassment can range from unwanted whistling to sexual assault. As Skoczylas explains, there’s a fine line between a pleasant interaction with compliments and harassing words that are disrespectful in nature.
“Rather than taking the route of trying to criminalize behavior, I think we need to focus on a cultural shift, changing attitudes so that we see each other as individuals to be respected rather than objects to harass,” Skoczylas said.
Sophomore finance major Casey Maher experienced catcalling in Oakland one night in
August. She walked to upper campus to meet with friends to watch a movie, but a friend
made a last-minute cancellation. Maher found herself alone in an unfamiliar place.
“Some guys pulled up next to me in a car and started yelling things out the window, like,
‘hey girl, get in the car, let us give you a ride,’” Maher said. “It made me feel really
uncomfortable and I had my hand on my phone to call the police.”

Carolyn Helenski, a sophomore communication science and disorders major, has
experienced catcalling in multiple cities. She recalls an instance with her mom in
Philadelphia that was particularly memorable, saying it was very degrading.
“One time I was in Philly with my mom for the afternoon, and a young guy was with his
friends on the street,” Helenski said. “When my mom and I walked by he said, ‘look at that nice, tight pussy in those pants.’’’
In this uncomfortable position, Helenski had an urge to stand up to the man, but her mom told her to act as if nothing had happened and just continue walking.
“Catcalling isn’t pretty when someone is trying to embarrass or harass you,” Helenski said.
“I went to say something, but [my mom] told me to just keep walking — which frustrated
me because a woman I look up to more than anyone didn’t feel comfortable standing up for herself or me.”

Other women in Oakland have experienced harassment from older men, not just fellow
college students.  Close Morgan, a junior who asked her last name be omitted for privacy, was walking back from her class in the Chevron Science Center when she stumbled into one such case as she passed a few construction workers on the sidewalk.
“As I got closer to them, I noticed that the one guy was staring at me,” she said. “Right as I
walked by, the guy who had been looking at me a little too long turned his head and said
‘hey beautiful,’ and watched me as I kept walking down the street.”
Morgan said she didn’t think much of the situation — she just smiled and continued
walking down O’Hara Street to Fifth Avenue, enjoying the compliment she was given.
“What was initially nice became super creepy when I was stopped at the crosswalk by
Thackeray,” Morgan said. “The same man popped his head out of the passenger side of a
white pickup truck and said, for the second time, ‘hey beautiful’ as his buddy kept driving.”
To avoid another encounter with the man, Morgan ended up taking the longest route
possible to get to her destination — an inconvenience for her to feel safe.
While Marshall continues to take her chances striking up conversations with strangers, she said she draws the line between friendliness and street harassment at a stranger’s ability to read context clues on a situation.
“I’m not trying to say that no one should talk to anybody else,” Marshall said. “I am saying that you need to respect my privacy, and that includes no shouting, no name calling.”
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No Surprise: Black Men Sexual Harass and Brutally Beat White Woman and Boyfriend

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/09/06/Black-Gang-Beats-White-Couple-in-Missouri-After-Sexually-Harassing-Woman

BLACK GANG BEATS WHITE COUPLE IN MISSOURI AFTER SEXUALLY HARASSING WOMAN

by WARNER TODD HUSTON  6 Sep 2014 

Police in Springfield, Missouri released shocking surveillance footage of a gang of six black males viciously attacking a man and his girlfriend in a driveway near a downtown nightclub.

The woman, Meredith Cole, told police she was sexually harassed outside the club by several of the black males on August 22. She quickly went inside to retrieve her boyfriend, Alex Vassey, a DJ at the Outland Ballroom. The pair then went outside to see if they could identify any of the harassers.
Once out on the street, a gang of six black youths snuck up behind them and started attacking the couple, beating them in their faces and kicking Vassey after he was knocked to the ground.
The video clearly shows Vassey being viciously assaulted, as well as showing the young woman being punched in the face and knocked to the ground twice.
The victims were both sent to the hospital and treated for multiple contusions, bruises, and cuts. Cole also suffered a fractured ankle.
Police were not able to apprehend any of the perpetrators and ask that if anyone recognizes the attackers in the video that they should call Crime Stoppers at (417) 869-TIPS (8477).
 

While on a return flight from JFK

On a return flight I was at JFK airport in New York and was apparently lost in a corridor. A black luggage handler, while walking with an old white male patron in the opposite direction JFK put his hand on my shoulder. In response I told him not to touch me. Yes, a covered Sunni Muslim who is a Black woman. No woman deserves to be touched by a stranger but this Black male went out of his way to disrespect me especially in the presence of a white man.

He begans to yell AT ME (because apparently black men think women are property or objects and have no rights to their bodily integrity) because I refuse to be disrespected, nonetheless by a stranger. You could tell he was an inner city minimum wage worker whom no one would keep company with.  Way to go black man.