Tag Archive | predators

A Tale of Two Black Male “Christian” Accosters in the State of Maryland

A young covered Sunni Muslim Black American woman was working as a cashier at the Weiss supermarket located at 9250 Washington Blvd N, Laurel, MD 20723.  On this day she was working at the customer service counter and was completing her transaction.  The customer was a black male “Christian” who kept demanding that she give him the change in his hand.  At the time the Muslim cashier was still retrieving the money from the register.  She had an eerie feeling regarding the black male and informed him that she was giving him his change but placing it on the counter.  He made the same demands and she informed him that she could not touch his hand (she already knew he was trying to get photo“more” than just change as supposed to any regular male or female customer).  She then placed the change on the counter, but close to his hand. He reached out and grabbed and tried to hold her hand. The Muslim cashier snatched her hand back while he stated, “I touched your hand, what are you going to do about it?”  She left her station to retrieve a manager and when they returned the black male “Christian” already left the store.

 I had a similar experience with a cashier at a restaurant. However, I didn’t assume that a black male who appeared to be 18 years old or less would try such a tactic with a grown woman—but this dark-skinned black male did so. I tried the same thing this sister did, to retrieve my hand quickly and was disgusted at his actions.  This black male simply laughed as if he accomplished something, well he did, accosting a covered Sunni Muslim woman.  To have a similar story as this sister, at a different place of business different years demonstrates the immoral and lustful nature of today’s black males. This was sexual harassment plain and simple, yet black male privilege and “Christian” privilege, no matter how wrong, offensive and illegal reigns supreme when the target and victim are Sunni Muslim Black American women.

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Another Woman’s Story from a College Newspaper: ‘Stop Catcalling’

http://www.the-standard.org/opinion/stop-catcalling/article_83bc96a4-1351-11e7-b633-5bb71f5ec316.html

The Standard, March 28, 2017

Stop catcalling

 Before coming to the United States, I had never experienced catcalls. When I first came to this country in August, I did not know this form of harassment existed until I went grocery shopping with my Chinese friends at an Asian market.  We were crossing the street, waiting for the lights to turn. All of a sudden, a guy rolled down his window and began to shout at us. More guys did the same thing afterward in just five minutes.  In that moment, all I wanted to do was get on the next plane home away from the insults. Feeling frightened by the rudeness, I was depressed and shameful because I regarded the gestures as unwelcoming messages to Asians. I have seen repeatedly in the news that discrimination toward Asians can happen in restaurants, schools and stations. I thought these men’s yells were part of that discrimination.

The same thing happened multiple times to my friends and I when we were walking on an empty street and on campus at night. I shared this story with my female American friends, hoping they would help me figure out the reason and come up with a solution. They told me this way of harassment is not aimed at Asians, ,but women. They think that it’s normal and when it happens, they endure it.

“Chilling out” over the catcalling situation does not work for me. My parents trained me to be a strong and fierce woman warrior, full of bravery and justice, so I decided shouting back at the catcallers was a way of self-defense.It should not come as a surprise that I chickened out of shouting at the catcallers because I found myself incredibly terrified of the consequences that could come with my response. What if they stopped the car and started to hit or rape me? What if they just grabbed a gun and shot me from a distance?

I remember finishing a day-long project and wanting to buy some groceries to rest my brain, but I soon realized that all the horrifying feelings of being catcalled and shouted at would reoccur. I lost the interest in shopping that day, and my only choice was to go home as soon as possible. When my parents called to check to see how I was, I squeezed a smile and told them everything was fine. Having them worried about me is the last thing I wanted to do.

My parents trusted America’s decency and grace, so they sent their beloved daughter to this great country. Sadly, some parts of this country went wrong.It’s 2017 now. Women shouldn’t have to put up with the rage they feel when they feel harassed. Stop street harassment.

Online Article: Street Harassment Is a Public Health Problem: March 20, 2017

https://www.citylab.com/crime/2017/03/street-harassment-is-a-public-health-problem-the-case-of-mexico-city/520185/Street Harassment Is a Public Health Problem

Women who have been harassed may feel less trust in their community, with potential long-term impacts on mental health and well-being.

Lauren Ferreira Cardoso

March 20, 2017

“I actually don’t remember when I was first harassed on the street, but I do remember when I first experienced it as an abusive act: I was an adolescent traveling with my mom in a crowded underground wagon, where men could easily touch women without anyone noticing and with little possibility to prevent it.

This was the experience of Lucía Vázquez, a researcher in Mexico City, Mexico. Unfortunately, her story is not unique.

According to a multi-country poll by YouGov, Mexico City ranks first among 16 international cities surveyed for physical and verbal harassment on public transportation. Street harassment, a form of gender-based violence against women, can include any act or comment perpetrated in a public space that is unwanted and threatening, and is motivated by a person’s perceived sex or gender.

Violence against women in public spaces is not exclusive to Mexico City, of course. Experiences of street harassment—from being whistled at to being touched without consent—are reported each day on crowd-sourced websites like Hollaback and Safecity in dozens of other locations from New York and New Delhi, to Lawrence, Kansas and Lubbock, Texas.

There is still much to be learned about how harassment and feeling unsafe in public spaces affects the well-being of women and girls—a topic I focus on in my doctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice—but the global scale of these experiences is concerning. Studies documenting the prevalence of street harassment in more than 35 countries show it could have widespread health effects across the globe.

Street harassment in Mexico City

One of the latest studies on this issue aimed to understand the extent of street harassment and its impacts on women, girls and communities in Mexico City. All of the women in this study had previously screened positive for intimate partner violence, a prerequisite for inclusion in the parent study.

Paola Abril Campos, a doctoral student at the Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is a native of Mexico City. She said in an interview for this article:

“Growing up, I learned to fake a phone call to my parents to feel safer and avoid harassment. I learned to wear not the clothes I wanted, but the clothes that made me feel ‘safe.’ I learned to take quick detours during my daily commute. And I learned to put up with the impotence I felt when harassed.”

Her experiences motivated her to conduct a study on street harassment that was published in January in Salud Pública de México, a journal published by Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health.

In this study, Campos and colleagues surveyed 952 women who were seeking health care in Mexico City’s community health clinics. More than 60 percent of the women, 62.8 percent, reported experiencing at least one form of street harassment in the past month alone. For one in four women, 26.8 percent, the abuse was physical.

The study found that the harassment, or fear of harassment, had negative impacts on the daily routines of these women. Nearly 70 percent reported some type of disruptions in their mobility, including missing, being late to or having to change jobs or schools. And yet, Campos said, “The costs and consequences of street harassment to women’s lives have remained invisible.”

The study also found that street harassment may diminish women’s sense of connectedness and trust in their community. Social isolation from one’s community can have long-term implications for well-being and can lead to chronic disease and poor mental health. Therefore, street harassment may contribute to these other public health concerns.

For the women in this study who were also victims of intimate partner violence, violence is a threat in both public and private. Jhumka Gupta, a global and community health professor at George Mason University and senior author of the study, stated: “Comprehensive interventions are needed to ensure women and girls’ safety both in public settings and in private spaces.”

Emerging solutions

There is some political will to address the issue in Mexico City. In conjunction with local authorities, UN Women has launched the program “Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces for Women and Girls,” which is promoting women’s safety through, among other mechanisms, providing women-only buses throughout the city.

The city’s mayor, Miguel Ángel Mancera Espinosa, is also supporting an initiative that distributes whistles to women that they can use when someone harasses them. The idea is to “break the silence” and bring attention to harassers.

Street harassment is a common problem in the United States too. A recent nationally representative survey found that 65 percent of U.S. women have faced street harassment at some point in their lifetimes. These numbers may be rising.

The Southern Poverty Law Center reports that there has been a post-election uptick of harassment and intimidation of many marginalized groups, including women. However, in February a new bill aimed at preventing street harassment in Washington, D.C. was introduced to its city council. It seeks to “eradicate street harassment in the District of Columbia through education, awareness, data collection and culture change.” The bill is broad and inclusive in its definition of street harassment and comprehensive in its approach. Will other cities follow its lead?

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

 

BLM Hypocrisy: Most Black “Christians” Violate Civil Rights of Sunni Muslim Black Americans-Protests Against Immigration Ban a Farce: PART III

 The following incidents have happened to me, someone who I personally know or relayed to me directly by a witness to these occurrences:

1) One late morning I was driving westbound on 175 West, also known as Waterloo Road towards Columbia, Maryland (USA). There weren’t many cars in the direction I was going in the 4 car lane. I had the right away when suddenly, a dark-skinned male who appeared to be form the City of Baltimore did not yield and intentionally made a left to what became a u turn from the eastbound direction.  He intentionally drove destructively as he literally stopped in the middle of the road and stared at me like he was going to pull a weapon.  I had to wait until he would drive and he had the AUDACITY to roll his eyes at me though I had the right of way and he was the one that nearly caused an accident.

2) Someone I know stated that she witnessed two covered Muslim women at a grocery store parking lot going to their cars in NW, Washington, D.C. (USA).  A group of black American females came out of nowhere and approached them, yelled at them then accosted them.  She stated that the black females were attempting to snatch the Muslim women’s hijabs off.  The person I know who witnessed it said she stopped and noticed another woman (white) who was already dialing the police on her cell phone. Both waited until the police arrived to be sure that they could be listed as witnesses.

3)  A college student who is a Sunni Muslim Black American young woman worked as a cashier at the Weiss grocer located at 9250 Washington Blvd N, Laurel, MD 20723 (USA).  A black “Christian” female began yelling at the young Muslim cashier noting that the employee did not have an Arabic first name (for some reason she assumed in order to be a Sunni Muslim one must be a foreign national and an Arab). The young lady attempted to be patient and explained that she converted to Islam. The black female “Christian” customer berated her (total stranger) stating “If I was your mother I wouldn’t tolerate none of that.” The woman was a total stranger, held up the line and apparently does not have an iota of civility or respect for boundaries with her blind hatred.

4) At the East Columbia Public Library, 6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia, Maryland a “religious group” (Black “Christians”) are given permission multiple spring seasons to proselytize in front of the public library (local government, publicly funded building) complaints filed. One obese woman literally blocked my entrance to the library and tried to “grill” me in the face. She is confronted by police becomes belligerent and argues at the officer and is physically removed from the property.

5) Attended an extended family member’s funeral at a First Baptist Church in Prince George’s County, Maryland. I was dressed in hijab and an abaya which I felt most comfortable in at the time in a house of worship.  One of my cousins sitting to my right was grieving heavily so I tried to comfort her as it was her dad’s death we were mourning. We were in a few rows back with other family. The Baptist preacher stared at me and interrupted whatever his ‘sermon’ was and said to me “I see we have someone who hasn’t accepted the Lord Jesus Christ as his personal savior.” Even the Christian relations were offended by his inappropriateness during their time of mourning and vulnerability. Everyone was silent and waited for the “preacher” to resume the funeral service.

6)  One day I was walking to university classes from the north to south campus buildings and there were some black male university students hanging outside.  It was apparent I was Muslim as I was in hijab and one of the black males audibly said “..if she wasn’t Muslim I would f*#@ her”:  not I would ask her out, court her, find out about her, or talk to her as a human being but rather one way or another (sexual assault) he would have his way with me. I pretended like I didn’t hear what was said and kept walking quickly, looking straight ahead.

7)  One day while driving to work in Washington, D.C., I was at a red light on New York Avenue, right before you get to the police station or academy on the right about two blocks before you can turn left onto H Street, NW, Washington, D.C. A dark-skinned black male emerged from the plexi-glass seating for the metro bus and started making masturbating gestures and thrusting. There was a white male driver in front of me with a luxury car and as soon as the light turned we drove as fast as we could to pass what was happening on the sidewalk.

8) On a bright and sunny mid-afternoon, I was returning to my car and making a purchase at the Target located 3343 Corridor Marketplace, Laurel, MD 20724 (Maryland City). As I was crossing from the store entrance walking towards the parking lot two black “Christian” females began laughing and gossiping about me. One of them stated, “..that’s why I don’t like them, they have flat butts.”  The other one responded, “nah uh, no she don’t.” I thought it was the strangest, lesbian-type of public conversation to have about a covered Sunni Muslim woman. I walked a bit quicker to get to my car.

9) One day I was in a government office in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. In the parking lot I ended up speaking with another Sunni Muslim Black American woman. I told her the observations and experiences I have had with Black “Christians” and that I did not understand why total strangers were so evil. She informed me that although she doesn’t wear hijab now, when she did, she and her brother were teased relentlessly by Black “Christians.” She even mentioned that she had a brother named Rashad and all the Black “Christians” would refer to her as “Ra-sh*@#.” The woman stopped wearing hijab primarily due to the discrimination both in social contexts with Black “Christians” and workplace discrimination because of her faith.

10) One early morning I was doing laundry at the laundromat located at 125 Bowie Rd, Laurel, MD 20707 on a Saturday. It was approximately a little after 6:00 a.m. and I was sorting clothes. I hear someone come from behind me (never made their appearance known) asking when did I arrive to the laundromat. No one said excuse me or appeared in front of me to indicate that he or she was addressing me. Second, it’s no one’s business, including a total stranger has the right to know my whereabouts. The Asian male manager and one employee was working in the laundromat so if she wanted to know when it opened she could have addressed an appropriate question to them.  But it was apparent that she felt she had the right to question and know my business though she, like all of the incidents I describe was a total stranger.

Anyway, the woman put her hand on me and tried to swing/push me around and stated with a grimace, “I’m trying to ask you a question.” I then smacked her hand off of me and stated, “You do not put your hands on a total stranger.”  Once again, the dark-skinned uncivilized black female kept talking, she responded “if you put your hands on ME again we will have a problem.” Yes, the woman who accosted me is now upset that I responded in like kind. In an even louder tone I stated “you touched me first.” She knew she couldn’t say anything further because there were cameras, witnesses and employees who saw the whole incident unfold. I continued, “..obviously I do not want to talk to you.” I informed that she was a “trouble-making n#@!r.” She turned quiet and the manager called the plaza security guard to which she said nothing further and stayed away from me the rest of the time I was doing my laundry. Once again TOTAL STRANGER.

 

Rally Against Street Harassment in New York: April 08, 2017

Anti-Street Harassment Rally in New York:

April 08, 2017. For Full Announcement please see:

https://nycprotests.com/nyc-protests/2017/4/8/2017-anti-street-harassment-rally

Another Black Woman’s Story: Black Men Keep Sexually/Street Harassing Her

Disgusting Black Men Never Stop…They carry the mark of Satan–troublemaking, debauchery and sinister lust. Here is her story:

http://www.beyondblackwhite.com/name-baby-rant-street-harassment-discrimination/

“My Name is NOT Baby,” a Rant About Street Harassment and Discrimination
MARCH 11, 2014 | ** GUEST AUTHOR ** |

One day, I was standing outside of a store waiting for my dad to meet me. While I was waiting, I made a phone call to my mom. While I was on the phone, I was approached my a man who was obviously more than twice my age who tried to engage me in a separate conversation. “Hey baby. I like them pants. What you up to tonight?” While there are so many ways in which I could have responded to him, I settled for a simple “I can’t talk right now, I’m on the phone” which he followed up with “Damn, girl I’m just trying to get to know you”. I suppressed a severe eye-roll and politely asked him to please leave me alone. When I didn’t respond to his advances, he proceeded to berate me with so many variations of “prude bitch”, my head began to spin.

I can’t walk down the street, pump gas into my car, shop in a grocery store, even sit in church without a man feeling entitled to harass me. They tell me to smile, they follow me around, they stare and whistle and honk their horns at my backside. They reach out and touch me without my permission.  Some even take pictures!

When I don’t acknowledge the man cat calling me from across the street, I’m a Stuck Up Bitch. All because I inform a man that my name is not “baby“, “sweetie“, or “ma“. I’m told “If I don’t want attention, I shouldn’t dress so attractively.” Some would say I shouldn’t be offended. This isn’t harassment, this is a compliment. If my boss, a strange man on the street, a security guard or store clerk wants to talk to me or stare at me or compliment me or follow me around, it’s just because they think I’m attractive. I should be honored. Shouldn’t I?

Let me go on record and say no, I shouldn’t be honored. This type of behavior isn’t a compliment, it’s harassment. I’m not obligated to smile just because a man wants me to. I don’t exist for the visual pleasure of men. I’d don’t have to speak to satisfy a man’s physical attraction to me or perceived “courage” in approaching me. And I’m not a bitch just because I don’t want to talk to a man I have no interest in.

Society has not changes much since the days in which Nathaniel Hawthorne penned “The Scarlet Letter“. Women are still judged harshly for our actions (and for our inaction). Only instead of having embroidered letters slapped upon our breast, we are instead being stamped with #hashtags in social media and with harsh labels from society and our peers.

Women in bad romantic relationships are labeled #SideLineChicks, #Sluts, #Hoes, etc. As if being in their predicament represents a character flaw on their part, not on the man who created the love triangle. A women who is assertive, aggressive, and is confident is labeled a #Bitch or #Bossy. A woman who enjoys sex and explores her sexuality is called a #Whore. When I don’t want to give my phone number to a stranger, I’m #StuckUp. A man being the boss, having sex as much sex as he wants, or wanting to be left alone is labeled a man.

What gives men the perceived right to label, ridicule, harass and demean women they don’t even know? Why is the biological fact that they are “men” enough for them to communicate with and about women in any kind of way? People say “that’s just how boys act” … “oh, he’s just being a man”. To me that’s barely an excuse. How can a man born of a woman be naturally inclined to treat women with disrespect? Sometimes, people assume I’m just a jaded woman. They tell me “you must not like men, that’s all” or they ask me if a man hurt me in my past. Why does there have to be something wrong with me just because I insist on being respected?

I tell people I’m a feminist and they look at me with confusion. What is a feminist, anyway? Many people (male and female) hear the word and they think of a radical bra-burning, man hating, ugly, lesbian who is under the delusion that they’re lives and treatment need to be equal.

That’s both offensive and limiting. Women are diverse. Our wants are diverse yet men assume we are all the same and treat us as such. A feminist is someone who believes in the social equality of all people regardless of gender. A feminist is someone who believes in respect for another human being regardless of gender. A feminist believes that being a man does not make you more powerful or more entitled to me, a woman. But I’m finding out now that people who hold this belief are few and far between.

Sexism is another unbelievable term. Even today, men are startled by the idea that women are oppressed anywhere outside of the Middle East. Why is it so unbelievable that in 2014 there is still harassment and discrimination against women? Why is my word and experience not enough to prove that the tragedy still exists?

It saddens me to admit that most of this discrimination and harassment comes from black men, my so called “brothers”.  How am I supposed to be responsible for lifting your spirits in a world that beats down upon you while you, the black man, is constantly berating me? Not only must I bear your suffering, but I must suffer under you. That’s not to say men of other races are excluded from harassment epidemic. When white men approach me the first thing they comment on are my lips, my hair, my hips, my breast and how they “always wanted a black women” as if all women of color are interchangeable and to have one is to have us all. As if having me at all is even an option, just because you want me. As if!

I confess to feeling a little depressed and powerless in these scenarios because in reality, I am somewhat powerless. Sometimes I feel like the only beings with the power to make any real change in the way women are treated and reacted to are the main ones responsible for the oppression. Women’s issues are everyone’s issues. And yet I feel constantly alone and criticized for crying wolf and calling men out on their privilege and outrageous behavior.

To the men out there, in case you still need convincing of your innate privilege given to you simply by being male (especially if you happen to be a white upper middle class male over 5’7″), allow me to break it down:

No reporter ever asks men how they plan to balance both their family and their career. (That’s a woman’s concern, right?)
Should you decide to run for office, political commentators will have nothing to say about what you wear to the podium.
Your value and intelligence are not directly linked to your sexual expression or lack thereof.
What goes on in your reproductive system is not under government regulation.
You can expect to see a group of men on a reality TV show who are not fighting. (“Bad Boys Club” just wouldn’t sell)
You can walk down the street at night (or anytime of day, really) and not be concerned for your sexual safety. (Do they make anti-rape, boxers yet?)
You can go nearly anywhere in the world and be allowed to wear what you want, go where you want, ride a bike, vote, go to school, work, pretty much do anything you want because you have a penis.
You aren’t criticized or called some variation of whore for appearing in public in minimal clothes (go shirtless if you want to, guys. Show off those abs!)
You can feel the freedom and right and even responsibility to comment on this article and tell me that my life experience and my opinions written here are wrong.
I have no ending for this piece. Just a plea for people to treat me (and others) with the respect I deserve not because I’m cute, or because I yelled at you and demanded that you speak to me with respect. But because I’m a human being. Not an object of your affection existing for your protection and attention That’s all.

Black Man Harassed Me at Shoppers Food Warehouse

During a grocery trip to Shopper’s Food Warehouse in Prince George’s County I was steering my shopping cart towards check out. All of a sudden a black male appeared in front of my cart, forcing me to stop the cart so I would have to acknowledge him. I soon realized he did this on purpose and he just stared at me, kept clearing his throat in a “ahem” manner and began smirking or something. He would not move out from in front of my cart and blocked my movement. I just said “nigger” to make him leave me alone and he walked away.