Tag Archive | newspaper

Academic Quote about Street Harassment

“Street harassment is a common occurrence in large urban areas. News articles and commentators report that street harassment is particularly frequent, intense, and sexually explicit in Washington, D.C.”

-Cynthia Grant Bowman, ‘Street Harassment and the Informal Ghettoization of Women’, 3 Harvard Law Review 517,529 (1993).

cgb

All Rights Reserved.

(In other words for decades black males have street harassed, dehumanized and awfully sexualized women, girls and female children.  You are guilty black man and you have been for a long time.)
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Men in France could be fined €90 for harassing women in the street

Anytime a country has to legislate basic manners and civility, it is an indication that the country becoming a third world-esque nation.  Maryland is already considering street harassment laws, while it is rumored that Los Angeles, California has already passed ordinances in which street harassers will receive citations. Yet France, on a national level decided to officially tackle the pervasive issue of sexual/street harassment.  At least one western nation is taking a stand. America, leader of the free world, what will you do?:

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Men in France could be fined €90 for harassing women in the street                                      Thursday 25 January 2018 12:25 GMT

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/france-fine-men-harassment-women-street-a8177296.html

Men in France could face fines of €90 (£78) for making lewd comments about women in public, under new plans to tackle street harassment.

A government report recommends enforcing the fine for behaviour that infringes on “the freedom of movement of women in public spaces and undermines self-esteem and the right to security”.

The plans come from a parliamentary working group on street harassment launched by gender equality minister Marlene Schiappa.

A longtime ally of President Emmanuel Macron, Ms Schiappa said in September that new measures were needed to address the “grey zone between consented seduction and sexual aggression”.

Men who make loud and lewd comments about women, follow them or block their path could be fined, according to measures suggested in the report.

The parliamentary group suggested imposing a €90 fine on those who pay immediately, increasing to €200 (£174) if it is paid within 15 days and €350 (£304) if the payment is later than that.

It did not recommend impose fines for wolf-whistling, according to French daily Le Croix, contrary to earlier reports.

The report is set to be presented to Ms Schiappa next week, along with France’s Minister of Justice Nicole Belloubet and Minister of the Interior, Gerard Collomb. The ministers will then put a bill on sexism and sexual violence to parliament.

Mr Macron has said tacking street harassment will be a priority for his government and in November said  ”women in the republic cannot be afraid to go out” .

Gang Stalking: Another Form of Street Harassment and It’s More Prevalent Than You Think

My Thoughts on Gang Stalking:  It’s More Prevalent Than You Think

When one thinks of street harassment, it usually conjures images of ‘slick-talking’ black (and West African) males with ‘no game’ who are wickedly desperate and therefore force themselves on strangers; or black male sexual predators who believe they can have easy access to vulnerable members of the general population:  women and children.

However, there is another type of street harassment that goes beyond the normal sexual deviancy of street harassers–gang stalking.

From what I understand and have experienced, it is a system of people (in my case black “Christians” who work in conjunction with the approving cooperation of low-level whites who are just like them) who seek to intimidate, stalk and eventually dismantle the sanity a particular person.  Persons (male and female) who engage in this conduct are total strangers who harbor ill-will towards humanity, but these people have information about this person that under normal circumstances they should not have; i.e., they are not a friend, employer, family member nor someone that I had transacted any business with.

Targets of gang stalking have spoken out tremendously about their experiences have noted that it includes gaslighting wherein the groups of individuals—who mind you do not appear in groups when they target the person engage in a series of activities intended to cause psychological harm and intimidation.  Other than sadistic pleasure they receive from harming a stranger, they seek to destroy the person based on what that person has that they don’t. Yes, it is primarily based on envy, but there is something more sinister in play:  their goal is to undermine the mind, achievement and talent of their target because quite frankly they do not possess those characteristics nor the wherewithal to achieve them.  I find this acute among black Americans and West Africans.  When they cause harm to their target(s) they will literally laugh and mock them in broad public, give threatening looks, pretend to ‘bump’ into their target to gauge their response to external, negative stimuli (which includes strangers for NO reason walking too close behind you and very audibly “sucking” their teeth or loudly “hemming in hawing” as a means to announce their existence in your presence and hopefully intimidate and/or aggravate you; or pretend to know the stranger in order to legitimize the lack of morals, intelligence and success they have in their own lives.  You will also find that they will provide the same excuse to justify their deviant behavior in both street harassment and gangstalking such as “she crazy” or the variant “I told ya’ll she crazy”, “I ain’t thinkin’ ’bout that b***** ” or “pssstsh you ain’t all that” and “so the f*** what.”  This is often accompanied by an insidious smirk or hysterical laughter which to an ordinary, reasonable onlooker appears to be what it is–out of context of normal social situations and “off.”

Others have indicated far more nefarious motives behind this type of criminality. They indicate that targets are often political dissidents, highly intelligent or are considered non-conformists.  One thing I have noticed with black “Christians” who perpetrate these crimes is that they often sit in their cars or on the side of buildings staring at their target and are always transmitting their observations via their mobile phones to other members of their gang stalking ‘group.’  They are dangerous and evil and agents of Satanic worship; this despite many of them who profess their “love” for Jesus Christ. Many people have awaken to the understanding that the person referred to as demonic will not take offense; those individuals will even laugh at the reference because they know it is accurate. It must be noted that these individuals are usually the purveyors of slander and are reminiscent of their historical black “Christian” predecessors who did the same to much more prominent blacks; just for money, approval by powerful individuals and to satiate the gaping dissatisfaction that fill their lives due to their own personal failings and lack of success. Thus, we can see that gang stalker also perform these acts on the job with the primary desire to rid an individual whom they believe is a potential threat to their own position, status or simply self-worth.  This should be considered a health crisis, but that would require Americans to actually admit the United States is filled with so many narcissistic dangerous individuals that it is better to keep the general populace under the grips of these dangerous persons.

Stalking is, just as harassment, illegal, but it remains a constant reality in American daily life.  It is better that these criminals are exposed rather than such maladaptation of human behavior becomes an ever-growing portion of the normalization of social dysfunction that plagues this country.

NEWS OPINION ARTICLE:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/27/catcall-street-harassment-misogyny-metoo-girls-women-misogyny

Oi you! Catcallers and street harassers – your time is nearly up                                November 27, 2017   Phoebe-Jane Boyd
It’s usually possible to tell when it’s about to happen. The signal could be a set of dull eyes staring out from the middle of a group of teenage boys. Or a brief smirk. Could be from a man in a suit, could be from someone looking like a grandad. Sometimes there’s no warning, just the prickling sixth sense of “I’m about to be told how my tits are looking today by a complete stranger”.
“Catcalling” is exasperating and humiliating, but something to be lived with if you’re female and you go outside a lot. Racism, ableism, homophobia and transphobia often get mixed into the cocktail of abusive comments, too, and as Noa Jansma’s @dearcatcallers project showed, they come from all ages and all classes. We recipients live with it, because of course we do. There is far worse than words for us to live through out there – #MeToo can show you a sample (only from women of certain economic backgrounds lucky enough to have an internet connection of course). Yet, strangely, a peaceful acceptance of street harassment as “only words” is something I’m yet to feel.

Violence could follow any insult or sexual comment, yelled or whispered, from a stranger on the street

Instead, each unprompted “slut” or “ugly dyke” from people I’ve never met causes embarrassment, irritation, but mostly anger within me. And it’s an anger that doesn’t bleed out; it builds. Latest example (which I’ll forget as new ones replace it): last week in Houston, a man was offering his opinion on each woman who walked by him. One in front of me was told she had a “nice ass”, I was called a “bitch”. I turned around and advanced on him, startled he grabbed at my forearms and babbled excuses. I yelled for him to get his damn hands off of me, until he let go and swiftly left the area, visually resentful.
Despite enjoying humiliating people who try to do the same to me first (I’m a “bitch”, remember), it’s no real outlet for the humiliation of street harassment – it’s a stupid and reckless thing to do. I know that, because everyone who has been catcalled knows that. The words of street harassment fall on a spectrum of disrespect. Violence could follow any insult or sexual comment, yelled or whispered, from a stranger on the street. The words are merely an opening parry, or a hint of how little your rights, or very existence, are respected. Women are still being hurt by people who hate them, everywhere.
The words are nothing compared with what they could be, but are also a reminder of that. They’re intended that way: a smug reminder, a smirking warning – don’t get too comfortable in your life. Don’t think you’re entirely safe out here; you aren’t. The actual message, and motive, behind street harassment is quiet and assured, and that’s why it’s so grating and tiring. Because we already know.
#MeToo is still so dissonant. Is sexual assault, violence, rape culture and ingrained misogyny actually being recognised, openly and honestly, as wrong at last? Are missing stairs not being stepped around any more?
Catcallers and street harassers, however, know they’re maintaining a system of sexism – it’s the motive, and that’s why it angers me so much. In 2015 a survey by Cornell University and the anti-harassment campaign Hollaback! on street harassment found that an international average of 84% of women have been victims of street harassment between the ages of 11 and 17. The 2014 Stop Street Harassment survey also featured some scary (but unsurprising, if you’ve experienced it) statistics of women being “reminded”.
In light of #MeToo, will the upcoming US-based survey report lower numbers of street harassment? Probably not – not yet. I suspect harassers will be offering more messages of the misogyny that still exists in the world for a while. But that’s a signal too – that change is coming, and they know it.
*All Rights Reserved

12 Moms Share Gross Stories Of Getting Catcalled While With Their Kids

A couple of months ago I posted a photo art representation of the different types of women who have and are catcalled by predatory black males.  These are athletic, religious clad, pregnant, women with children, professional women to name a few.  It was the traditional argument that men were to protect women, but America has regressed in which the average American woman needs protection FROM certain males, i.e. the predatory vagrants.

There was a recent news article published in the Huffington Post regarding street harassment in which mothers share their stories of being street harassed while out in public with their children:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/12-moms-share-gross-stories-of-getting-catcalled-while-with-their-kids_us_59414a7ce4b003d5948c8270

06/15/2017 04:34 pm ET

12 Moms Share Gross Stories Of Getting Catcalled While With Their Kids

“Did you know your mother’s hot?”

Juanmonino via Getty Images
I was totally unaware being catcalled while with your children is so incredibly common.

I was once catcalled while wearing my son in a baby carrier. I guess the presumed presence of my body underneath the baby strapped to my torso was apparently good enough for the guy who shouted at me as I was on the way to daycare one day.

Another time, my harasser used my son as the middle man, directing his “You’ve got a beautiful Mommy, you know that?” to the stroller I pushed in front of me. “NO!” I thought but didn’t say because I tend to avoid the uncertainty of conflict in these situations. “You don’t get to use my son to catcall me!”

We’re entering summer, which for many women and non-binary people is when street harassment escalates. It’s always unpleasant, but it may be even more unpleasant and jarring when it happens in the company of your children.

I didn’t know this was a common experience until I started asking. Just as every woman I know has a story of some guy harassing her, so do many mothers had a story of being harassed while out with their children. Some of them are almost amusing in their sheer nerve, some are shudder-inducing, and they unanimously make you want to say, “Ugh.”

Below, 12 women speak out on what the experience is like.

1. “He suggested to the kids that mommy should give him her number.”

I had a guy follow my children and I into the parking lot of a grocery store telling me how beautiful I was and asking for my number. He suggested to the kids that mommy should give him her number. I considered backing up over him with my car. ― Jamie Lechner

2. “What a cutie! And the baby’s not too bad either!”

I was carrying my 9-month-old through the parking lot of a department store to my car and a man was staring at us for an uncomfortably long amount of time, enough to make me pick up my pace and avoid eye contact. Then he yelled, “What a cutie! And the baby’s not too bad either!” He thought he was so funny. Ugh. ― Brie Riley

3. “I want my daughters to know that they can speak up for themselves and that it is not OK with me for strangers to comment on my body.”

Summers are always the worst for catcalling but it gets even worse when my kids are in tow. Men feel they can comment on my tattoos whenever they feel like it and when it does happen, I ignore them or tell them to stop speaking to me. It’s important to do this in front of my daughters because I do not want them growing up feeling like they can be objectified.

I want my daughters to know that they can speak up for themselves and that it is not OK with me for strangers to comment on my body. Hopefully it rubs off on them. ― Jennifer Clark

4. “I have been catcalled at 7 months pregnant.”

If it counts, I have been catcalled at 7 months pregnant (and VERY visibly so, I was wearing a dress which proudly showed the bump!). I was most confused ― did the man saying “Hey sexy mama” and making crude gestures think I was going to haul my large pregnant self into his white van and have sex with him?! ― Ayesha Jeary

5. “I can be his daddy.”

A few years ago, I was walking with my 2-year-old son when a man walked up to us and leered, “I can be his daddy.” We ducked into a restaurant. Thankfully, he was too little to notice. I just ignored the man. Nowadays, we have an open dialogue about how we treat girls and women. ― Sara Heistand

6. “He was so confused as to why mommy went from cheerful to fearful in seconds.”

I was leaving a large retail store at the anchor end of a mall with my son. We were laughing and I was swinging my bags in one hand and holding his with the other while he skipped, as we crossed the lane and into the parking lot. It was dusk and I hear a man whistle and shout. I was so used to it that I automatically stiffened up and picked up my pace, without acknowledging it. I was practically dragging my son by the time the man caught up to us and started asking to “be friends” and saying how “handsome” my son is.

I moved away briskly and he picked up his own pace and asked if I “wanted company this weekend.” I was almost running now so he stopped and then proceeded to shout “Ugly, b*tch, high on yourself” at my back, followed by more name-calling and slurs. I covered my son’s ears and jumped in the car. He was so confused as to why mommy went from cheerful to fearful in seconds and the vibe of our fun, late afternoon had totally changed.

I waited for 10 minutes before getting back out of my SUV to get my son situated in his car seat; he was only 3 1/2 at the time. (There are more instances but that one stuck out in my memory most because it was the most frightened I ever was with my son present.) ― Kasandra Powell

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7. “And that, my fellow feminists, is how you sexualize a fetus.”

When I was pregnant with my first child, a random stranger told me that if the baby was a boy he’s be a lucky little sod sucking on those tits. And that, my fellow feminists, is how you sexualize a fetus. ― Nesta May

8. “I wear my daughter all around our hood and stay getting hit on.”

I wear my daughter all around our hood and get hit on. My husband thinks dudes don’t realize I have a baby in there and one guy actually told me that. But I don’t buy it. What the hell else would be in this OBVIOUS baby carrier? A bowling ball?

And pregnancy catcalls were also a thing but thinly veiled as “compliments” like “Oh you look good girl” and “Wish I was the daddy.” I walked to work until the end and got not shortage of street harassment. ― Helena Andrews-Dyer

9. “You just had to have it, didn’t you?”

I was pushing my twins in a stroller when they were about 18 months old when an older man leered at us and said “You just had to have it, didn’t you?” I had no idea what he was talking about and said “What?” He replied, “Oh the thing that gets you two babies born so close together,” and then winked at me.

They are boy/girl twins and don’t look much alike so he probably thought I had gotten pregnant again very soon after giving birth to the first. Either way, I was really grossed out and mumbled something about them being twins and got the hell out of there.  ― Kelly Wilson Bossley

10. “It just feels particularly unkind.”

I’ve gotten pregnant catcalled and every time I’m just like WHAT??! I give them a look or say something to the effect of “Are you fucking serious?” I mean, I guess it’s no more or less offensive than regular catcalling ― pregnant bodies are beautiful and it can look sexy I guess. It just feels particularly unkind. ― Melissa Petro

11. “Did you know your mother’s hot?”

The worst was once when we were waiting for the subway and some dude leered at me and then said to my kid, “Did you know your mother’s hot?”

I just ignored him because I’m always scared about escalating stuff. Later when my son asked me about it I just said, “We live in a really messed up culture that thinks women’s bodies are public property.” ― Anne Thériault

12. “I feel so uneasy when I’m catcalled while with my kids.”

I was once catcalled on my way to the pool with my two young daughters. The man was driving while I was walking. I ignored him and turned left onto a one-way street. He drove in reverse down the one-way street still catcalling to me and trying to get me to give him my number. My daughters were 2 and 4 at the time. This was in NYC. I was terrified!

Even for a NYC street, there was no one else around. I thought he was going to kidnap us. My daughters didn’t ask me anything and I didn’t tell them anything either. They don’t remember thankfully.

However, I feel so uneasy when I’m catcalled while with my kids. Almost like the only reason they’re catcalling me is because I have children. Almost like I’m an easy target or prey. Maybe I’m overthinking it but it feels like it’s my kids some of these men are after. ― Doris Villegasfor clarity.