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Academic Quote about Street Harassment

“Street harassment is a common occurrence in large urban areas. News articles and commentators report that street harassment is particularly frequent, intense, and sexually explicit in Washington, D.C.”

-Cynthia Grant Bowman, ‘Street Harassment and the Informal Ghettoization of Women’, 3 Harvard Law Review 517,529 (1993).

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All Rights Reserved.

(In other words for decades black males have street harassed, dehumanized and awfully sexualized women, girls and female children.  You are guilty black man and you have been for a long time.)
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The Pitt News: Pitt students condemn catcalling

https://pittnews.com/article/127683/arts-and-entertainment/pitt-students-condemn-catcalling/

Pitt students condemn catcalling
Joanna Li | Staff Writer
February 14, 2018

As a 12-year-old, Sophia Marshall stepped out of the house feeling confident in thePA map
outfit she had picked out that morning. As she waited for a friend by the local high
school, she heard a sharp whistle from out of the window of a passing car — her
first experience with catcalling.

Marshall, now a junior business administration major at Pitt, recalled feeling conflicted at the time — a mix of validation and violation.  It wasn’t until she came to college that the instances of catcalling became more frequent for Marshall — happening on the bus, her nightly walk home in Central Oakland and during her summer abroad in Paris — causing her to feel fed up.
“I’m not your baby, I’m not your honey,” Marshall said. “You don’t know me.”
According to a Cornell study, 85 percent of women experience street harassment before age 17 — and some women in Oakland are in that majority. Walking in groups of three or more, carrying pepper spray at all times and knowing a few self-defense techniques are all tips in the back of the minds of some women who have experienced street harassment at Pitt.

Marie Skoczylas, a visiting instructor in the Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies
Program, offers a definition of catcalling and its effects.
“Catcalling is singling out a target for sexual objectification and commenting publicly on
that person’s appearance,” Skoczylas said. “It requires a sense of entitlement to pull a
stranger into that kind of situation, knowing the advance may well be unwelcome and
insulting.”

Catcalling is part of the larger issue of street harassment. According to “Stop Street
Harassment” — a nonprofit organization focusing on ending gender-based street
harassment — street harassment can range from unwanted whistling to sexual assault. As Skoczylas explains, there’s a fine line between a pleasant interaction with compliments and harassing words that are disrespectful in nature.
“Rather than taking the route of trying to criminalize behavior, I think we need to focus on a cultural shift, changing attitudes so that we see each other as individuals to be respected rather than objects to harass,” Skoczylas said.
Sophomore finance major Casey Maher experienced catcalling in Oakland one night in
August. She walked to upper campus to meet with friends to watch a movie, but a friend
made a last-minute cancellation. Maher found herself alone in an unfamiliar place.
“Some guys pulled up next to me in a car and started yelling things out the window, like,
‘hey girl, get in the car, let us give you a ride,’” Maher said. “It made me feel really
uncomfortable and I had my hand on my phone to call the police.”

Carolyn Helenski, a sophomore communication science and disorders major, has
experienced catcalling in multiple cities. She recalls an instance with her mom in
Philadelphia that was particularly memorable, saying it was very degrading.
“One time I was in Philly with my mom for the afternoon, and a young guy was with his
friends on the street,” Helenski said. “When my mom and I walked by he said, ‘look at that nice, tight pussy in those pants.’’’
In this uncomfortable position, Helenski had an urge to stand up to the man, but her mom told her to act as if nothing had happened and just continue walking.
“Catcalling isn’t pretty when someone is trying to embarrass or harass you,” Helenski said.
“I went to say something, but [my mom] told me to just keep walking — which frustrated
me because a woman I look up to more than anyone didn’t feel comfortable standing up for herself or me.”

Other women in Oakland have experienced harassment from older men, not just fellow
college students.  Close Morgan, a junior who asked her last name be omitted for privacy, was walking back from her class in the Chevron Science Center when she stumbled into one such case as she passed a few construction workers on the sidewalk.
“As I got closer to them, I noticed that the one guy was staring at me,” she said. “Right as I
walked by, the guy who had been looking at me a little too long turned his head and said
‘hey beautiful,’ and watched me as I kept walking down the street.”
Morgan said she didn’t think much of the situation — she just smiled and continued
walking down O’Hara Street to Fifth Avenue, enjoying the compliment she was given.
“What was initially nice became super creepy when I was stopped at the crosswalk by
Thackeray,” Morgan said. “The same man popped his head out of the passenger side of a
white pickup truck and said, for the second time, ‘hey beautiful’ as his buddy kept driving.”
To avoid another encounter with the man, Morgan ended up taking the longest route
possible to get to her destination — an inconvenience for her to feel safe.
While Marshall continues to take her chances striking up conversations with strangers, she said she draws the line between friendliness and street harassment at a stranger’s ability to read context clues on a situation.
“I’m not trying to say that no one should talk to anybody else,” Marshall said. “I am saying that you need to respect my privacy, and that includes no shouting, no name calling.”
4 close

Time Life Presents…

Warbles of the Black Male Street Harasser & Gang Stalker

02 16 2018 project-1.jpg

 

 

Read in quick voice at the end of commercial:  This is for educational purposes only.  You only risk attracting black male street harassers and gang stalkers if you use this CD. Warning for informational usage to warn would be victims of the violent mentality of black male street harassers., Time Life is a registered trademark. All Rights Reserved. Time Life nor any songwriters of the songs referenced have not endorsed this post. Satirical user discretion is advised.

 

Black Male Street Harassers are the Devil. PERIOD.

There are 1 billion people on the planet and for some reason in the Washington, D.C. metro area, especially Maryland, black male “Christians” will stalk, street harass, accost and assault decent women photowho are total strangers who reject their advances.   To the rational thinking person, it makes absolutely no sense why these black males take rejection so personally, only to solidify that they are insecure and have low-esteem despite the false over the top machismo they manufacture to perpetrate street harassment as a normal function of male genes. Normal, well-adjusted, and well-educated men do not street harass by the way.  So to recap, somehow out of a billion people on the planet, dark-skinned black males choose to attempt to humiliate, disrespect and assault women who had nothing to do with them and continue to not to have anything to do with them, and only by observation verify that they made the right decision in the first place.  These are the black so-called representatives of Christ of today, their logic being if you don’t let me hit on you, have my way with you or sexually assault you, I will disrespect you in the alternative by hurling verbal abuse, non-sensical defense of savage behavior aimed at women who are TOTAL STRANGERS.  The reason why this is normal is because today’s ghetto black “Christians” have no moral compass.  They are coddled by their single black “Christian”, democratic party voting mothers whose example is how to use the government system to their advantage and use men.  Thus, their example in life is to use people, when a discerning, decent woman can by observation detect the corrupted DNA sequence that comprise these low-level black “Christian” males and the same males are met with lack of access, this is when you see the apes in heat go bizerk.  They spiral into hysterical laughter, insults, “..didn’t want you anyway,” “you ain’t all that,” “f*@! you,” and all kinds of verbal drivel to divert the fact that they never had a chance and must now soothe the initially fragile ego. It is utterly fascinating and disturbing at the same time how these dark-skinned black “Christian” males attempt to defend their conduct, all the while the reasonable intelligent woman knows that they street harass because they assume 1) that you are easily accessible (quite satanic that they believe a covered, religious person actually is), 2) the woman that they are targeting is either unintelligent or vulnerable.  There is NO way a good, well-mannered, discerning woman could accept this as normal or flattering behavior.  Remember there are 1 billion people on the planet and some sadistic black male strangers see fit to stalk, harass, disrespect and humiliate a woman who by proper discernment seeks no interaction with these vagrants.  Yet, out of all the millions of people in the country, these black male vagabonds short-circuit and set forth plots to destroy these women who are total strangers.  You cannot tell me that course of behavior is not simply pure evil.

Just to be clear, these are the same types of black males who claim to be part of or support Black Lives Matter, which obviously does not apply to other blacks and focuses on the liberalization of criminal activity and ignores criminal conduct of ghetto blacks upon innocent Black Americans.  Then again, it makes sense they are supporters of such a movement, black women are not any type of beneficiary of it.  So now we venture into why black male street harassers are devils.

cartoon devilOne of the non-theological definition of devil is:  an atrociously wicked, cruel, or ill-tempered person.’ Another definition is ‘mischievous,’ this aptly describes black male street harassers.  Street harassers are troublemakers because they initiate conflict and originate situations of distress where none previously existed.  Trouble is a synonym for mischief, thus by any rational thinking person street harassers are mischief-makers, better known as devils.  So, why would a black “Christian” devil (oxymoron, but hey it’s logical to them) believe that they have the right to street harass a religious person? A covered Sunni Muslim black American woman?  It is easy, let us take a look at opposites, good v. bad, wicked v. righteous, devil (deceiver, peacemaker, someone who causes distress) v. someone at peace or minding their business or who would not even consider such a disrespectful beggar as worthy of their time.  Ill-tempered? Check. Please refer to this post:

https://blackmanleaveusalone.wordpress.com/tag/not-fooling-anyone/

 Since most street harassers are black males and street harassers are devils, thus most of today’s black males = devils, minions of Satan.

A Tale of Two Black Male “Christian” Accosters in the State of Maryland

A young covered Sunni Muslim Black American woman was working as a cashier at the Weiss supermarket located at 9250 Washington Blvd N, Laurel, MD 20723.  On this day she was working at the customer service counter and was completing her transaction.  The customer was a black male “Christian” who kept demanding that she give him the change in his hand.  At the time the Muslim cashier was still retrieving the money from the register.  She had an eerie feeling regarding the black male and informed him that she was giving him his change but placing it on the counter.  He made the same demands and she informed him that she could not touch his hand (she already knew he was trying to get photo“more” than just change as supposed to any regular male or female customer).  She then placed the change on the counter, but close to his hand. He reached out and grabbed and tried to hold her hand. The Muslim cashier snatched her hand back while he stated, “I touched your hand, what are you going to do about it?”  She left her station to retrieve a manager and when they returned the black male “Christian” already left the store.

 I had a similar experience with a cashier at a restaurant. However, I didn’t assume that a black male who appeared to be 18 years old or less would try such a tactic with a grown woman—but this dark-skinned black male did so. I tried the same thing this sister did, to retrieve my hand quickly and was disgusted at his actions.  This black male simply laughed as if he accomplished something, well he did, accosting a covered Sunni Muslim woman.  To have a similar story as this sister, at a different place of business different years demonstrates the immoral and lustful nature of today’s black males. This was sexual harassment plain and simple, yet black male privilege and “Christian” privilege, no matter how wrong, offensive and illegal reigns supreme when the target and victim are Sunni Muslim Black American women.

…even in 2017

The caricature of the hyper-sexualized black brute has become self-fulfilling prophecy. The true Black men of the past would be so ashamed and disgusted at what a core group of black American “Christian” males have morphed into the past several decades:

even in 2017

Online Article: Street Harassment Is a Public Health Problem: March 20, 2017

https://www.citylab.com/crime/2017/03/street-harassment-is-a-public-health-problem-the-case-of-mexico-city/520185/Street Harassment Is a Public Health Problem

Women who have been harassed may feel less trust in their community, with potential long-term impacts on mental health and well-being.

Lauren Ferreira Cardoso

March 20, 2017

“I actually don’t remember when I was first harassed on the street, but I do remember when I first experienced it as an abusive act: I was an adolescent traveling with my mom in a crowded underground wagon, where men could easily touch women without anyone noticing and with little possibility to prevent it.

This was the experience of Lucía Vázquez, a researcher in Mexico City, Mexico. Unfortunately, her story is not unique.

According to a multi-country poll by YouGov, Mexico City ranks first among 16 international cities surveyed for physical and verbal harassment on public transportation. Street harassment, a form of gender-based violence against women, can include any act or comment perpetrated in a public space that is unwanted and threatening, and is motivated by a person’s perceived sex or gender.

Violence against women in public spaces is not exclusive to Mexico City, of course. Experiences of street harassment—from being whistled at to being touched without consent—are reported each day on crowd-sourced websites like Hollaback and Safecity in dozens of other locations from New York and New Delhi, to Lawrence, Kansas and Lubbock, Texas.

There is still much to be learned about how harassment and feeling unsafe in public spaces affects the well-being of women and girls—a topic I focus on in my doctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice—but the global scale of these experiences is concerning. Studies documenting the prevalence of street harassment in more than 35 countries show it could have widespread health effects across the globe.

Street harassment in Mexico City

One of the latest studies on this issue aimed to understand the extent of street harassment and its impacts on women, girls and communities in Mexico City. All of the women in this study had previously screened positive for intimate partner violence, a prerequisite for inclusion in the parent study.

Paola Abril Campos, a doctoral student at the Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is a native of Mexico City. She said in an interview for this article:

“Growing up, I learned to fake a phone call to my parents to feel safer and avoid harassment. I learned to wear not the clothes I wanted, but the clothes that made me feel ‘safe.’ I learned to take quick detours during my daily commute. And I learned to put up with the impotence I felt when harassed.”

Her experiences motivated her to conduct a study on street harassment that was published in January in Salud Pública de México, a journal published by Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health.

In this study, Campos and colleagues surveyed 952 women who were seeking health care in Mexico City’s community health clinics. More than 60 percent of the women, 62.8 percent, reported experiencing at least one form of street harassment in the past month alone. For one in four women, 26.8 percent, the abuse was physical.

The study found that the harassment, or fear of harassment, had negative impacts on the daily routines of these women. Nearly 70 percent reported some type of disruptions in their mobility, including missing, being late to or having to change jobs or schools. And yet, Campos said, “The costs and consequences of street harassment to women’s lives have remained invisible.”

The study also found that street harassment may diminish women’s sense of connectedness and trust in their community. Social isolation from one’s community can have long-term implications for well-being and can lead to chronic disease and poor mental health. Therefore, street harassment may contribute to these other public health concerns.

For the women in this study who were also victims of intimate partner violence, violence is a threat in both public and private. Jhumka Gupta, a global and community health professor at George Mason University and senior author of the study, stated: “Comprehensive interventions are needed to ensure women and girls’ safety both in public settings and in private spaces.”

Emerging solutions

There is some political will to address the issue in Mexico City. In conjunction with local authorities, UN Women has launched the program “Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces for Women and Girls,” which is promoting women’s safety through, among other mechanisms, providing women-only buses throughout the city.

The city’s mayor, Miguel Ángel Mancera Espinosa, is also supporting an initiative that distributes whistles to women that they can use when someone harasses them. The idea is to “break the silence” and bring attention to harassers.

Street harassment is a common problem in the United States too. A recent nationally representative survey found that 65 percent of U.S. women have faced street harassment at some point in their lifetimes. These numbers may be rising.

The Southern Poverty Law Center reports that there has been a post-election uptick of harassment and intimidation of many marginalized groups, including women. However, in February a new bill aimed at preventing street harassment in Washington, D.C. was introduced to its city council. It seeks to “eradicate street harassment in the District of Columbia through education, awareness, data collection and culture change.” The bill is broad and inclusive in its definition of street harassment and comprehensive in its approach. Will other cities follow its lead?

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.