Archive | January 2016

Her Name Was Janese Talton-Jackson and She Was Killed Because She Said No

This article appeared recently (yesterday) regarding a Black woman refusing a blaGunck male “Christians” sexual advancement and harassment.  Her only crime, she said “no” to a black male STRANGER who would have only end up raping her.  In America, especially the Mid-Atlantic region and certain parts of the South, black male “Christian” strangers are notorious for harassing every and any type of woman: pretty, educated, poised, ghetto, religious, atheist, Jew, Sunni Muslim, Nun, doesn’t matter if you are covered for religious reasons, indicate that you have no interest in being sexually harassed and accosted by a black man, they will bother you EVERYDAY.  This is especially true in the State of Maryland, Washington, D.C. and Virginia and states with a enclave of urban areas.  This goes beyond sexual harassment, she was murdered for having some class.  Like I said before the majority of black American “Christian” men believe Black women and women of color are property–especially women who are total strangers.Here is the article:

Her Name Was Janese Talton-Jackson and She Was Killed Because She Said No http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2016/01/her_name_was_janese_talton_jackson_and_she_was_killed_because_she_said_no.html

I did not know Janese Talton-Jackson on a personal level. There’s a chance I might have seen her before. And a lesser chance I might have spoken to her. But if I did either, I don’t remember.

But after news of her death began to circulate on Facebook on Friday afternoon, and more and more people spoke of her, I learned that there weren’t many degrees of separation between us. Practically none, actually.

She left behind three children. Twin girls and a 1-year-old son. The father of her daughters is the son of my mom’s best friend, Ms. Debbie. She also lived in a house owned by Ms. Debbie—a house right next door to my dad’s house. They’re separated by two driveways and a line of hedges. My dad was devastated by the news. And if that’s not enough of a connection already, Janese’s brother happens to be Pennsylvania state Rep. Ed Gainey, a man I’ve known for 25 years.

I first became acquainted with Ed through basketball. When my dad would take the 9-year-old me to the courts behind Peabody High School to work on my game, Ed was one of the older teens and early-20-somethings who’d often be there, too. Some days, after I was done drilling, my dad would play with them and I’d watch them play. Then, as I got older and better, I’d play with them too. Today Ed is a popular politician and a friend. And now, as of early Friday morning, brother to a murdered sister: a woman shot and killed in the street by a man because she said no.

According to the police report, Janese was at Cliff’s Bar, located in Pittsburgh’s Homewood neighborhood. As the bar neared closing, she was approached by Charles Anthony McKinney, who apparently was interested in her. The interest wasn’t reciprocated, and she left. McKinney allegedly followed her outside, was rebuffed again and then shot her in the chest. She was declared dead at the scene. She was 29.

As I write this, my 2-month-old daughter is 10 feet away in one of her bassinets, fussing. I’ve had to pause from writing twice in the last half hour to check on her. To see if she’s making noise because she’s hungry or cold or hot or wet. But, as I suspected, it’s none of the above. She just wants to be played with, and she’s fussing because she’s bored. So I oblige, stopping every 15 minutes or so to pick her up and make faces at her.

While doing this a moment ago, I noticed that she takes up much more space in her bassinet than she did even a month ago. She will, eventually, outgrow it completely. And then she will learn to walk. And then, years from now, she will leave the house on her own. She will have friends. She will learn to drive. She will go out. And there will be men she is not interested in who will be interested in her. Some might catcall from cars and corners. Some might grab her arm or her waist at the bar. Some might buy her a drink. Some might approach her on the street.

 

Some of these advances will be ignored or unacknowledged. Some met with kind but deliberate body language to convey her lack of interest. And some will even be met with actual words—her actually saying some form of “I’m not interested” out of her actual mouth.

 

But while she can control how she responds to the approach and how she communicates her lack of interest, she cannot control the response to her response. She will have no idea if the guy she says no to will cuss her out. Or spit in her face. (Which happened to my wife before.) Or follow her five blocks to her apartment. (Which has happened to a friend before.) Or follow her outside the bar, ask again, get rejected again and kill her. Which happened to Janese Talton-Jackson.

 

That the world is a specifically dangerous one for women and girls isn’t some grand epiphany I just recently had in having a daughter. I’ve read (and written) enough about it, and I’ve seen enough news about it. I’ve also heard enough first- and second- and third-person stories from friends, girlfriends, cousins and homegirls who have either had this type of violence happen to them or know someone who did. I’ve even watched comedy skits about it.

In one of his HBO specials, Louis C.K. jokes that a woman agreeing to go on a date with a man is literally insane. Because, he continues, we (men) are the No. 1 threat to women’s lives. (Men’s biggest threat? Heart disease.) But the continued existence of our species depends on men approaching women, and women eventually saying, “Yes, I will agree to meet you somewhere of your choosing while alone and at night. Even though, statistically, you’re my No. 1 threat.” Which, he also jokes, is like a man having to date nothing but half-bears/half-lions and hoping that nothing bad happens.

But having a daughter (and a wife) introduces another element to my relationship to this danger. Not empathy—that already existed—but fear. Of course, not every boy and man interested in my daughter will express this interest or respond to her disinterest aggressively, disrespectfully or violently. The vast majority will not. But there is no way of removing those who will from her interactions, no way of avoiding them completely, and that scares the f–k out of me. As I’m sure it scares the f–k out of my wife. And as I’m sure it scares the f–k out of the women who also happened to be at Cliff’s Bar that night.

Janese Talton-Jackson is dead because a man was interested in her. And then killed her when that interest wasn’t reciprocated. But she could have been any woman he happened to be interested in that night. The only thing separating her from the women who made it home alive Friday is chance. Sheer luck.

And this, again, is f–king scary. Not just because of how frequently this happens, but also because I know there will be people—men and women—who will hear about this murder and will immediately think, “Well, she must have said something disrespectful” or “She didn’t have to embarrass him by saying no. Just give him a fake number” or “How was she dressed?” or “What was she even doing out that late in Homewood?” As if this—men responding to disinterest with violence—weren’t epidemic. As if any of this were her fault. And as if “What could she have done to prevent this?” matters at all, and “What can and should men do to stop men from doing this?”—which, ultimately, is the only relevant question here—doesn’t.

I did not know this young woman. But I know several people well who knew her well. None of that really matters, though. Who she knew, who knew her; how she could have been my sister, my daughter, my friend, my wife—those are red herrings. What matters is that she existed. She was alive. She was somebody. And now she’s gone, because she said no.

——————

BLACK MAN LEAVE US ALONE

He should have been also charged with a hate crime as his wreckless disregard for human life was aimed at a woman (gender).  Unfortunately, this will not be the last time a Black woman dies because she chose to preserve her dignity over being street/sexually harassed by a black male stranger-predator.

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News Article: College Student’s Death Might Be Tied To Street Harassment

Like I said, in today’s America, the best thing a conscious woman can do today is avoid the majority of black males.  I read the original story on another news outlet and arrived at the same conclusion: another woman dies because she rejected a black male’s advances.  When street harassment ends in death.

http://www.refinery29.com/2016/01/100660/college-student-shot-new-years-eve-texas

Eric Jamal Johnson, a U.S. Marine, has been arrested for the murder of Sara Mutschlechner, a 20-year-old who was shot and killed in Denton, Texas, as she drove friends home in the early hours of New Year’s Day. With Johnson’s arrest come details of that night that suggest Mutschlechner’s death came after street harassment escalated to violence.

Denton police spokesman Shane Kizer told CNN that there was an exchange between Mutschlechner and her car’s three passengers and a car carrying five or six men. “It was an amicable conversation to begin with, but quickly went downhill and some derogatory statements were made toward the female occupants of that vehicle,” Kizer said. “Some comments were made back towards him, even a couple of threats were thrown. About that time, they were driving through the intersection…when several shots were fired.”

Mutschlechner, who was hit in the head by a bullet, died later that day at a local hospital. Kizer described the passengers who were in the car with Johnson when it fled the scene as “persons of interest.”

Emily May, executive director of anti-harassment nonprofit Hollaback!, told us, “Street harassment is on a spectrum of gender-based violence. When street harassment is okay, it makes groping okay. And when groping is okay, it makes assault okay. And when assault is okay, it makes murder okay. To make sure what happened to Sara doesn’t happen to anyone else, we need to stop this cycle where it starts.”

 

Anne Arundel County, Odenton, Maryland Library

So one morning I was walking from the parking lot towards the Anne Arundel County Public Library, located at  1325 Annapolis Road, Odenton 21113.  The sidewalk entrance is like a big cement open foyer and is semi-circle.  From the side of my right eye I noticed a black male “Christian” walking horizontally towards me instead of towards the entrance of the door.

I literally did an about face and started walking either back towards my car or the grass of the Library grounds on its western side.  The black male was relentless and still followed me as I zig zagged again towards the library’s lobby.  He nearly cut me off from the door and had the audacity to say: “Oh I didn’t mean to scare you,” with a nasty smirk on his face. So a religiously clad woman walking in every opposite and diagonal direction AWAY from you did not give you a social cue that you are frightening her? I did not respond and kept walking until he breached my space and said “Oh are you a Christian?”  This is the dumbest question Black”Christian” males ask as a pick up line, follow a woman who is alone and clearly has no interest in being bothered by you and it is inappropriate and disgusting. I refused to look at him and said “no” and was close enough to the entrance that I walked right to the circulation desk where I knew employees would be.

There are still uncouthe and illiterate black males in Maryland who are so repulsive, so dumb and ignorant to see a Sunni Muslim in traditional hijab (religious head covering), avoiding male strangers and still attempt to force their unwanted presence.  Once he saw me with a couple of members of the library staff he quickly disappeared and I did not even see him in the library the entire time I was there.  This was broad daylight but no one was around in the parking lot so he likely planned ahead to corner me off from accessing the library where patrons and staff would be.

Today’s black males continue to disgust and harass women in the state of Maryland.  Maryland refuses to have a task force specially equipped to enforce hate crime and street harassment laws.

Black man leave us alone.